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Bayard Rustin reads the demands of the March

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Summary
The Educational Radio Network / ERN's coverage of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Eighth of fifteen hours of broadcast: 3:56 P.M. - 4:25 P.M. Martin Luther King Jr. intro, Bayard Rustin reads demands, Randolph reads Pledge, Rev Benjamin E. Mays of Moorehouse College give the closing benediction and people disperse.
Topics
Demonstrations, Speeches, addresses, etc., American, March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington, D.C., 1963., Civil rights, African Americans
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Transcript

Demands of the March on Washington

BEGIN AUDIO
[CROWD NOISES]
Hulsen:
The introduction for the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Randolph:
A philosopher of a non-violent system of behavior in seeking to bring about social change for the advancement of justice, and freedom and human dignity. I want to introduce now Brother Bayard Rustin, who will read the demands of the March on Washington Movement. Everyone must listen to these demands. That is why we are here. And now, Bayard Rustin, deputy director of the March will read the demands.
Rustin:
Friends, at five o'clock today the leaders whom you have heard will go to President Kennedy to carry the demands of this revolution. It is now time for you to act. I will read each demand and you will respond to it. So that when Mr. Wilkins and Dr. King and the other eight leaders go, they are carrying with them the demands which you have given your approval to. The first demand is that we have effective Civil Rights legislation, no compromise, no filibuster, and that it include public accommodations, decent housing, integrated education, FEPC, and the right to vote. What do you say?
[Crowd - cheers]
Rustin:
Number two. Number two. They want that we demand the withholding of Federal funds from all programs in which discrimination exists. What do you say?
[Crowd - cheers]
Rustin:
We demand that segregation be ended in every school district in the year 1963.
[Crowd - cheers]
Rustin:
We demand the enforcement of the 14th Amendment, the reducing of congressional representation of states where citizens are disenfranchised.
[Crowd - cheers]
Rustin:
We demand an Executive Order banning discrimination in all housing supported by Federal funds.
[Crowd - cheers]
Rustin:
We demand that every person in this nation, black or white, be given training and work with dignity to defeat unemployment and automation.
[Crowd - cheers]
Rustin:
We demand that there be an increase in the national minimum wage so that men may live in dignity.
[Crowd - cheers]
Rustin:
We finally demand that all of the rights that are given to any citizen be given to black men and men of every minority group including a strong FEPC. We demand.
[Crowd - cheers]

The pledge of the revolution

Rustin:
And now ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Randolph will read the pledge. This is a pledge which says our job has just begun. You pledge to return home to carry on the revolution. After Mr. Randolph has read the pledge, I will say, "Do you so pledge?" And you will say, "I do pledge."
Randolph:
The pledge: May you stand. Standing before the Lincoln Memorial on the 28th of August, in the centennial year of emancipation, I affirm my complete personal commitment to the struggle for jobs and freedom for Americans.
To fulfill that commitment, I pledge that I will not relax until victory is won. I pledge that I will join and support all actions undertaken in good faith in accord with the time-honored Democratic tradition of non-violent protest, of peaceful assembly, and petition, and of redress through the courts and the legislative process.
II pledge to carry the message of the March to my friends and neighbors, back home and arouse them to an equal commitment and equal effort. I will march and I will write letters. I will demonstrate and I will vote. I will work to make sure that my voice and those of my brothers ring clear and determine from every corner of our land.
I pledge my heart and my mind and my body unequivocally and without regard to personal sacrifice, to the achievement of social peace through social justice.
Rustin:
How do you pledge?
[Crowd: I so pledge.]

Benediction

Randolph:
We have finished this great demonstration. Now I want to introduce for the Benediction, a distinguished leader of the church and education. President of Morehouse, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays will give the benediction.
[Applause]
Mays:
Let us bow our heads in prayer. God of history and of all mankind. God of Abraham and Moses, Amos and Isaiah, Jesus and Paul. God of our weary years, God of our silent tears pour thy benediction upon the United States of America.
Pour it out upon President Kennedy and the members of his cabinet upon whose shoulders the destiny of all mankind may rest. Pour it out upon the nine Justices of the United States Supreme Court who need wisdom to interpret wisely and courage to hand down just decisions. Pour out thy benediction, God, upon the members of Congress, who need wisdom, courage, a sense of justice, deep faith in democracy and an abiding faith in their God to enact legislation that will further implement American dreams.
Here we are, God, one hundred-eighty million people, one hundred years after Lincoln freed the slaves, ninety-eight years after the close of a bloody civil war, fought to preserve one nation under God, indivisible. One hundred eighty-seven years after Jefferson declared that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
Here we are God, confused, baffled, floundering, afraid, faithless, debating whether the Congress of the United States should pass legislation guaranteeing to every American the equal protection of the law. Debating whether its business should have the right to discriminate against a man because thou, oh God, made him black.
In peace and in war thou hast blessed America as the nations of the earth look to the United States for moral and democratic leadership. May we not fail them, nor thee. Please God, in this moment of crisis and indecision give the United States wisdom, give her courage, give her faith to meet the challenge of this hour. Guide, teach, sustain and bless the United States, and help the weary travelers to overcome, someday soon. Amen.
[Crowd: Amen.]
Hulsen:
The benediction from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College. And this officially concludes this 2-½ hour Lincoln Memorial program. A part of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The some hundred and seventy-five thousand Americans are now beginning to leave the Lincoln Memorial. Placards are once again being held up.
Unidentified:
[inaudible] Will the demonstrators [inaudible]... Cooperate with the marshals on every corner.
Hulsen:
On the podium now, directions are being given to the demonstrators.
A recording of a previously taped event continues on the ¼ inch archival tape, unrelated to the March on Washington, until 1:01:20
Enter the timecode: