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WGBH Media Library and Archives
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The WGBH Media Library and Archives records are largely organized around the broadcast series and programs for which materials were created. Collections contain records organized around a particular topic, material type, or grant-funded project. Series aired on WGBH and/or PBS.

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A series of debates with a moderator facilitating the discussion of national and international issues - using advocates who would introduce witnesses to support their point of view. Debates recorded at Boston's Faneuil Hall.
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"From the Vault" is an ongoing collaboration with WGBH Radio (89.7) and WGBH.org, bringing treasures from the archives to new audiences.This curated collection gives a sense of the range of the WGBH archives, highlighting rare or seldom-seen materials.
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As part of the Educational Radio Network, WGBH broadcast live coverage of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom from Washington, D.C. Speakers included A. Philip Randolph, John Lewis, James Farmer and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
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08/28/1963
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Louis Lyons hosts this series of programs that discuss the problems and performance of the American Press in reporting leading questions of the day. Guests included Edward R. Murrow. Theodore H. White and Dr. John Kenneth Galbraith.
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Built on stories from and about the innovators who defined the music that has rocked the world, Rock and Roll explores the musical styles, influences, and creative processes that have allowed rock to endure, from its renegade beginnings in the 1950s to the 1990s.
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Say Brother is WGBH's longest-running public affairs television program by, for and about African Americans, now known as Basic Black.
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The New Television Workshop at WGBH supported the creation and broadcast of experimental works by artists from 1974 to 1993.
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The Ten O'Clock News was a nightly news program produced and broadcast by WGBH. A local program aimed at the Boston audience, The Ten O'Clock News debuted on January 15, 1976.
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Vietnam: A Television History was a landmark documentary series produced by WGBH. This collection contains most of the materials gathered and created for the 1983 series, as well as additional Vietnam-related materials from the WGBH archives.
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War and Peace in the Nuclear Age is a thirteen-part PBS series on the origins and evolution of nuclear competition between the United States and the former Soviet Union, first broadcast in 1989.
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"Alive From Off Center" was established in 1985 as a production of KTCA (St. Paul - Minneapolis). The show featured independent works by artists in a variety of media. Its showcase format was similar to the Workshop's "New Television" series. At some point the series changed its name to "ALIVE TV." Many works created by or for the Workshop were also shown on "Alive From Off Center." Additionally, some Workshop produced pieces were co-produced and/or commissioned by KTCA specifically for the series. Susan Dowling served as Executive Producer for these programs.
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As television's longest-running, most-watched history series, American Experience brings to life the incredible characters and epic stories that helped form this nation.
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American Playhouse was a weekly series of drama, comedy and musical productions. First production was John Cheever's "The Shady Hill Kidnapping." American Playhouse productions have included filming stage presentations; theatrically released films; produced for television dramas.
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"Artist's Showcase" was a series designed to showcase video art and experimental work from WGBH. The program ran on Sunday evenings at 11 P.M., from the fall of 1976 through 1982. In the early 1970's, "Artist's Showcase" was the only consistent broadcast outlet for many of the Workshop productions. Most materials of broadcast quality created at WGBH in the mid-1970's were shown as part of this series... more
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Part of new plan of news programs and specials that premiered January 1974, “The Compass Weekly” aired each Tuesday for a minimum of one hour. It was devoted to a single news topic covered in depth, with commentary and review of coverage elsewhere.
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The Contemporary Art Television (CAT) Fund was a joint venture between Boston's Institute for Contemporary Art (ICA) and WGBH's New Television Workshop. Funding came from the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and Humanities' New Works program in 1983. Co-directors were WGBH's Susan Dowling (New Television Workshop Director, 1982-1993), and David Ross (ICA Director). Kathy Rae Huffman served as curator and producer. The Fund's primary objective was to award money to video artists for new works... more
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"Dance for Camera" was the earliest series created by the Dance Workshop, which was coordinated at the time by Nancy Mason. The series was broadcast in 1976. Carmen De Lavallade, a former dancer with Lester Horton, John Butler and others, recorded introductions for the shows. The series appears to have been broadcast nationally. Some of the works were rebroadcast as part of the "Frames of Reference" series.
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The "Dance Archiving Project" was created to film performances of individual dancers and dance troupes. Initial plans were to interview famous dancers and create a resource center for researchers and students of modern dance. However, only one interview, with Honi Coles, was completed.
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The Evening Compass was a half-hour program airing Monday - Friday at 7 pm, repeated at 10:30. With co-anchormen Ed Baumeister and Louis Lyons, its purpose was to interpret news already reported elsewhere and to recognize, report and interpret news not reported elsewhere.
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"Frames of Reference" was a series that began circa 1978. Half-hour shows were produced to showcase commissioned and already created works. It was around this time that the focus of the Workshop shifted, to concentrate more heavily on creating works for broadcast. During its time, "Frames of Reference" was the focus of the Workshop's national arts programming effort... more
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The Music Image Workshop was primarily a project of Ron Hays, who used the Paik-Abe video synthesizer to create elaborate visual scores set to music. It was funded by the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts from 1972 through 1974. Hays worked closely with WGBH producer and director, David Atwood, to create both live broadcasts and finished works. Additionally, works by other artists were presented under the auspices of the Music Image Workshop.
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Known alternatively as "New Television Workshop" and “New Television,” the umbrella series began as a local pilot production of WNET (New York) in 1986. In 1987, WGBH signed on as co-producer, and the shows were aired in Boston and New York. In 1988 and 1989, KCET (Los Angeles) and WETA (D.C.) became producers in association. In 1991, PBS picked up "New Television," and it was broadcast nationally... more
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"Poetry Breaks," conceived by Leita Hagemann Luchetti and co-produced by Luchetti and WGBH New Television Workshop, is an ongoing series of over 100 thirty-second to four-minute spots presenting internationally known poets reading their work on location. These have aired individually on WGBH and public television stations across the country. The Workshop collaborated with Luchetti until its' closing in 1993, at which point the works became co-productions of Luchetti and the larger WGBH Foundation.
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Say Brother is WGBH's longest running public affairs television program by, for and about African Americans, and is now known as Basic Black... more
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"Soundings" was a music documentary program affiliated with the Workshop and produced by Bernice "Bunny" Olenick.
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This project was the second of what was to have been a collection of interviews with artists of all fields, the goal of which was the formation of a national videotape archival center at WGBH. Edited segments of these interviews were to be used for broadcast.
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"Visions" was a series showcasing experimental dramas produced by WNET (New York). Fred Barzyk and Olivia Tappan developed a close working relationship with WNET producer David Loxton, which led to the creation of several works, including collaborations with writer Jean Shepherd.