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Ngo Dinh Luyen First. Mr. Luyen, the first question is the issue of why Bao Dai chose your brother and how he chose him. Yes, to answer, there are several...One must remember several events in order to make the answer intelligible. Good. You have to know that Bao Dai needed someone with authority. Bao Dai no longer conferred authority, right. What Vietnam in that era needed, right, was someone with authority over Vietnam, over the Vietnamese people. Well, the...in all the countries once colonized by the French, the French
Summary
Brother of Ngo Dinh Diem, Ngo Dinh Luyen was appointed ambassador to the United Kingdom. Ngo Dinh Luyen recounts why Bao Dai chose Ngo Dinh Diem to be the first president of South Vietnam. Ngo Dinh Luyen describes the panic in South Vietnam around August 1954 due to the advancing Communist forces... more
Date Created
01/31/1979
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Vietnam: A Television History / America's Mandarin (1954 - 1963)
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SR 2090 NGUYEN THI NGO 657, Take 1 Clapstick Interview with Nguyen Thi Ngo, village woman, 55. What were Diem's policies like? Diem was extremely brutal in his policies. He rounded the people up and relocated them. He expropriated and usurped our land. His scheme was to attack the people and press their heads down. And he wanted our people, . SR 2091 Beep tone Roll 91 of Vietnam project 660, Clapstick Interview with Nguyen Thi Ngo continues. What did you do that day when you heard the gunfire
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Nguyen Thi Ngo describes political and economic repression under the Ngo Dinh Diem regime. She recalls in the women of her village helping Viet Cong soldiers with food and first aid during the Battle of Ap Bac.
Date Created
03/12/1981
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Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu [also known as Tran Le Xuan] Take 1. Roll 1. Ah, c’est je commence? You, you have been the first from the Western media to have, to have fulfilled those conditions eh was the government of President Ngo Dinh Diem because he was the only one to accept to have accepted peaceful confrontation with Admiral Bao Dai, who preceded him, to challenge him. So the only legitimate power of Vietnam was the one assumed by President Ngo Dinh Diem and it was precisely that one that the US...it was precisely that one who
Summary
As the sister-in-law of President Diem, Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu was considered the first lady of South Vietnam in the late 1950s through the early 1960s. Here she argues that the Diem government was the only legitimate government in South Vietnam, that they were undermined by the United States and that the United States, therefore, paid a price. She discusses the Buddhist Crisis of 1963 and the results of the Paris Peace Accords... more
Date Created
02/11/1982
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Vietnam: A Television History / America's Mandarin (1954 - 1963)
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Date Created
June 1968
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for me to stay behind. During this period I helped rally and direct the people in the struggles to get the Geneva Agreement implemented. When the Americans got rid of Bao Dai and installed Ngo Dinh Diem, repression, for an invasion of the North and an attack on the socialist camp. Therefore, the population in the South, from an old man to a young child, was extremely outraged by the Americans and the Ngo Dinh Diem, SR 2034 NGUYEN THI DINH 311, take 1 interview with Nguyen Thi Dinh Clapstick Could you tell us your first understanding at the sight of the landlords
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Nguyen Thi Dinh was a Deputy Supreme Commander of the National Liberation Front. Following the war, Madame Dinh served on the Central Committee of the Vietnamese Communist Party and became the first female Major General of the Vietnam People’s Army. She describes in detail her activities against the French, and her subsequent arrest and torture. She then details the repressions suffered under Ngo Dinh Diem, the Tet Offensive, the Phoenix Program, and the fall of Saigon.
Date Created
02/16/1981
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. The general Trinh Minh The is an old Caodaist general who had fought against the French during the whole French war in South Vietnam. And he joined up with President Ngo Dinh Diem in 1955. So he was a great supporter of Ngo Dinh Diem, and he was equally a very important asset for Diem for the fact that he, the national funeral for General Trinh Minh The who was buried at Tay Ninh and I happened to go see President Ngo Dinh Diem pay homage at his casket. And he was very sad. He had truly lost a very important asset, . You have to begin again with the subject. When in 1957 the government of the United States invited President Ngo Dinh Diem to make his first state visit to Washington, DC. For Diem it was an extraordinary voyage, it was payback for all
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As a former general in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, Tran Van Don was pivotal to the toppling of Ngo Dinh Diem during the 1963 coup d'etat. Here he recalls life under French colonialism, the rule of Bao Dai, and his relationship with Ngo Dinh Diem - leading to the coup d'etat and death of Diem.
Date Created
05/07/1981
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Vietnam: A Television History / America's Mandarin (1954 - 1967)
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Confucian type of philosophy. But they are not Buddhists. Now those few active Buddhists, Thich Ton Tran and some of them, did a beautiful job in getting the outside world to feel that this Catholic, President Ngo Dinh Diem, hated the Buddhists so much and he was in a small minority group of religious, she joined Diem's younger brother, Luyen, who had been the ambassador in London, who had eleven children. Mrs. Nhu with her two children and eleven Luyen children lived in bigger French apartment not too far from where I lived and one of our staff from the NATO staff American
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United States Ambassador to South Vietnam from 1957 to 1961, Elbridge Durbow describes his first impressions of Saigon, comparing it to a southern French provincial town. Durbrow talks about his first meeting with Ngo Dinh Diem and the differences in personality between Diem and his brother Nhu. Durbrow supported the idea that the US should stand behind Diem and continues on to describe the 1960 attempted coup against Diem. Durbrow also recalls the role the Chinese played in the Vietnam conflict and the lessons learned from Vietnam.
Date Created
02/01/1979
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Vietnam: A Television History / Legacies
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. Ngo Dinh Diem was truly a fascist. I lived here throughout the Ngo Dinh Diem period. And I realized that Diem wanted to become another king. Formerly Diem had been a high court mandarin. For example, Diem’s family, which lived hear the Phai Cam bridge here in Hue, forced all the intellectuals, bureaucrats, and university professors to wear ancient garb to come to the courtyard every year on the occasion of Tet and (unreadable) there, chanting New Year’s wishes and Long Life to Ngo Dinh Diem, his mother and other members of his family. His mother was sitting on a golden, . I don’t know how cruel Hitler was, but I can certainly say that there were no crimes against human beings which resembled the crimes committed by the Diem regime here during the post-Hitler era. As far as religious freedoms were concerned, Ngo Dinh Thuc, Diem’s brother and the archbishop in charge
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Writer Hoang Phu Ngoc Tuong describes the events of the Hue uprising. While he recalls that it was considered a victory, he notes that the Americans retaliated harshly. Hoang Phu Ngoc Tuong describes the “Nine Tunnels” where communist supporters were held and states that Ngo Dinh Diem forced all Buddhists to convert to Catholicism. This led to the Buddhist uprising and citywide protests, which eventually led to the end of the Ngo Dinh Diem regime.
Date Created
02/29/1982
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Vietnam: A Television History / Tet, 1968
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Turning. Marker. Ev Bumgardner: Clapstick. 516 The first question is would you describe Ngo Dinh Diem for us. You talked about him when you first got there. Well as I remember Ngo Dinh Diem, he was a physically short, pudgy little man who hated to be viewed or photographed from the back because he kind of waddled like a duck, a rather higher than normal voice level, who spoke a funny central Vietnamese dialect, that was rather hard for most Vietnamese to understand, . Can we stop for just a moment? Marker. Clapstick. 517. Just a moment. Just a moment. Right Could you describe Ngo Dinh Diem for us
Summary
Everett Bumgardner, a US Information Agency employee recalls meeting Ngo Dinh Diem and Diem’s reaction to the United States and American attitudes to Vietnamese customs and traditions. He describes Americans entering Vietnam and not fully understanding the culture and not having the background or experience to make professional judgments. Bumgardner explains in detail the dynamic between the Americans and Ngo Dinh Diem and the Agroville Program.
Date Created
04/29/1981
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Vietnam: A Television History / America’s Mandarin (1954 - 1963)
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SR 2079 Y BLOC Beep tone Roll 79 of Vietnam Project, March 6, 1981. 587 Take 1 Clapstick Interview with Col. Y Bloc. During the Diem period, in 1963, what were the policies of the Diem regime towards the ethnic minorities? Did they want to divide and rule the ethnic minorities, did they relocate you, and so on? Please describe the situation to us. From 1961 on I was in charge of the sixth zone. During this period the Ngo Dinh Diem's policies were to carry out the strategic hamlet programs and to establish concentration camps, creating
Summary
Y Bloc was a colonel in charge of establishing a prison camp for the Ngo Dinh Diem regime, among other responsibilities. He describes the long-term policies of the Ngo Dinh Diem regime toward ethnic minorities. He runs through the establishment and destruction of strategic hamlets. He recounts his role during the Spring Offensive and of the ethnic minorities in Durlac.
Date Created
03/06/1981
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Vietnam: A Television History / America’s Mandarin (1954 - 1963)