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. [END OF TAPE 009051] ONCE YOU TOOK OVER AS CHAIRMAN OF THE PAKISTAN ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION WHAT WAS THE POLICY OF THE COUNTRY AT THAT TIME, that Pakistan wanted to establish a nuclear free zone in South Asia to debar the entry of nuclear weapons in the sub-continent. LET ME ASK YOU THAT AGAIN, of Pakistan at that time made a proposal for the establishment of a nuclear free zone in South Asia. WHAT WAS YOUR REACTION IN 1974 WHEN THE INDIANS TESTED A PEACEFUL NUCLEAR DEVICE
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Dr. Munir Ahmad Khan was a nuclear engineer, who chaired the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission from 1972-1991. The interview opens with his background and the early years of Pakistan’s nuclear program. He recalls the period around the Atoms for Peace speech and the 1950s generally as an “era of great expectations.” Proliferation, he notes, was not an issue then or in the early 1960s, until the Chinese test... more
Date Created
02/08/1987
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War and Peace in the Nuclear Age / Haves and Have-Nots
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, I think it was Miami, Florida we ended up, well the tour ended up in Texas, that's where everybody broke up and went their separate ways. But the audience we had to play, in some places we played we had to play twice; once, it was like in a barn or something. Was that common in the fifties where you'd have to play for two separate audiences? Very common, very common especially down southern, you know down South way like, with the lyrics. We've been talking about how a band would have to play to separate audiences during this time in the fifties, touring around the country and especially in the South. In '56 or so when Elvis started
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Interview with Johnnie Johnson [Part 2 of 3]
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Rock and Roll / Renegades
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white audience? Were there local things that happened that indicated that was going to happen? Well in, in my world everything was local and by local I mean from, you know, like Alexandria, Louisiana, south. Today you, than anything else. It was kind of letting them not feel like if they messed up the world was coming to an end. But, ah, Dave Bartholomew was good about keeping sessions going even when we were trying to let people relax and get, , had a, had a, you know, a blessing and a curse all wrapped into one. The, the, the blessing was, it forced people to perform from beginning to end whatever they were going to do and, and be ready to do it all. Ah, the curse
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Interview with Cosimo Matassa [Part 2 of 2]
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Rock and Roll / Renegades
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advisor in the Mekong Delta for two years, from 1959 to 1961. I was there at the time that America felt that its greatest success had been achieved in establishing the Ngo Dinh Diem government as the legitimate government throughout South Vietnam. But that legitimacy was based upon, . END OF SIDE B OF THIS TAPE. VIETNAM JOHN McALLISTER (cont.) TAPE 4, SIDE A ch Testing on the...Interview with John McAllister continued. Camera Roll 744, and positions. End of McAllister interview on Tape 4, Side A
Summary
John T. McAllister was a Navy advisor in the Mekong Delta from 1959-1961. In this interview, McAllister recalls that a major problem with the Vietnam War was the failure of the United States to recognize that prior to US arrival, Vietnam had been engaged in a revolution. McAllister argues that the United States was unprepared for what was occurring. He believes that the Saigon government neither understood how to share power nor realized that they were not supporting the villagers in their struggle.
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. Why did that happen? I think that happened because there was not a clear appreciation of what we wanted to do in Vietnam. We started in there and thought it would be a short haul; it ended up being a long haul, it ended up being one, the leadership of the Army knew what they were trying to do in Vietnam? Well, I think that the leadership of the Army had a view of what they believed the political leadership wanted them to do, and that was to be able to sanitize South Vietnam so that the South Vietnamese could run their own country. But I don't believe that there was a clear appreciation between the administration, the politicians, and the military as to exactly what military force could do so that the politicians then could decide whether
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General Edward C. Meyer served in the United States Army in Vietnam from 1965 to 1970. After the war, he served as the Army Chief of Staff, overseeing an army-wide modernization program. In the interview, General Meyer recalls the condition of the Army coming out of Vietnam, and the steps that were needed to rebuild the Army as an effective fighting force, especially regarding the recruitment and training of non-commissioned officers. He then offers his perspectives of the lessons of the Vietnam War, and its analogies to contemporary debates about American intervention in Central America.
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Vietnam: A Television History / Legacies
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this conclusion, I think, remains in force. [END OF TAPE 676000] DOES IT REFLECT THE DIFFERENCE IN PERCEPTIONS, of new space armaments, that opens the door to space, providing a new substance to the arms race, which subjugates the scientific efforts of a whole group of modern countries with the burden of creating weapons of (mass) destruction, this conception, between the Soviet and American points of view. Just look at the history of the struggle for the ending of nuclear testing, and you will see that full agreement on... that the achievement of an agreement on total cessation of nuclear testing was always
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Evgeny Velikhov trained as a theoretical physicist, beginning his career in the early 1960s. He was the Founder and director of the Soviet Nuclear Safety Institute; Vice president of the Soviet/Russian Academy of Science, and Founder of the Committee of Soviet Scientists for Peace and Against the Nuclear Threat. He begins by asserting that the Krasnoyarsk radar was designed for observing space objects and verifying arms agreements... more
Date Created
12/15/1986
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War and Peace in the Nuclear Age / Reagan's Shield
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with it on the 23rd and so it was inspired by concern over a military problem -- but also the President's rather moral motive of trying to find out if there is an alternative to weapons of mass destruction. YOU WERE AWARE, nuclear weapons, and you simply cannot put them back in the bottle. The same thing with other weapons of mass destruction like chemical weapons in World War I. Well, they are still around. We have not been able to get rid of them for as an intelligent human, . And, so, for the first three or four years, they continued the same strategy. But by the time the end of 83 came and we began to have very concrete evidence of success in stemming the tide, such as our ability in Europe to deploy the INF missiles
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Robert McFarlane was National Security Advisor to President Reagan from 1983-1985, and a leading architect of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). In the interview he discusses Reagan’s strategic modernization program. He notes the president’s response to the nuclear freeze movement, and the freeze movement’s response to Reagan’s proposal for strategic reductions. He moves onto SDI, which he says was designed as a military solution and as a moral alternative to nuclear weapons... more
Date Created
12/18/1987
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War and Peace in the Nuclear Age / Missile Experimental
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couldn't do that. So we ended up getting another place to stay. But when we went to the Electric Circus, talking about a very warm place and a good training for us, and we got just super tight there. It was really great, . Speaking of slaps on the back of the head, if you could tell me about being down South. Because I understand that, I mean, we know about the racism, but evidently you and Greg as long-haired white boys had problems. That's when I'd get slapped in the back, , standing up, you know? You had told me something about when you were down south and they wouldn't let you into the hotel, like there were a place for black folks, a place for white folks -- Oh yeah, Greg and I had to sleep
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Interview with the Family Stone [Part 1 of 4]
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Rock and Roll / Make it Funky
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the Resistance, he went north to Thai Nguyen and I went south to Thanh Hoa. Still later on, when he asked me to join the government as the Deputy Minister of Health, he made time to visit with me once a month, . But the bombs heightened rather than dampened our spirit. This was something quite strange. Since after the end of the war, and without all those bombs dropping down on us, we have lost much of our former fervor. We are now complaining about housing shortage and food shortage, but during the war years you, Orange was being used (garbled) and what did you do after that? It was not until 1970 that we realized the magnitude of the problems created by Agent Orange. Through the victims of Agent Orange who came to us from the South and through
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Dr. Ton-That Tung grew up in Hue, the seat of the Nguyen Dynasty. He recalls the Forbidden City and the plush lifestyle of Bao Dai, the last Emperor of Annam. He describes his youth under French colonial rule, his decision to join the Viet Minh after meeting Ho Chi Minh, and his wartime coordination of medical supplies. He discusses his research on the long-term health effects of Agent Orange. Finally, he recalls a famine in Hanoi under Japanese rule, and describes his patriotism and loyalty to Vietnam.
Date Created
02/02/1981
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to put you into jail. Then there were different ahm groups that developed, or splinter groups. There was a lot of rednecks from Texas or the Deep South who hated people from California or from New York because they were liberals. And, . The other drugs were, came over from the border somewhere. I don't know where but ah it was more prevalent down south than it was up north cause it was harder to get up in the north. In the north you could just get heroin or marijuana, take a drive into the city, people would shoot at you and you were not allowed to shoot back at them, because they were ARVN's or the South Vietnamese army or they were civilians, and they didn't want something like My Lai to happen or anything, any bad publicity to happen in the newspaper
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George Cantero served as a medic in Vietnam. He describes a high level of drug use by American soldiers. He also describes declining morale among the troops as a result of military policies and de-escalation, recounting the “fragging” or attack of a superior officer as one example. Finally, he discusses the withdrawal of American troops from Vietnam and his own return to the United States.
Date Created
05/12/1981
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Vietnam: A Television History / Vietnamizing the War (1968 - 1973)