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South End (Boston, Mass.) Place Vietnam
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Agreement was signed, there was the decision to have the Communists withdraw to the north. That is to say, you go back to where you come from. Those people who wanted to have freedom should go to the south to live, below, that the Americans would not dare to carry the war to the North or to Communist China. So naturally they went on fighting and creating problems for the South. The American people, in the meantime, were quite opposed to the war, . What did this Agreement to Vietnam? We saw all kinds of disadvantages to South Vietnam. After the signing of the Agreement, the Communists continue to bring all kinds of weapons and ammunition into the South
Summary
General Tran Van Nhut discusses the effects of the Paris Peace Agreement, Watergate, and the withdrawal of American troops on South Vietnam. He describes the South’s continued efforts to thwart the North at the end of the War. Finally, he recounts the surrender of General Minh in 1975 and describes life under Communist rule in Vietnam.
Date Created
11/11/1981
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Vietnam: A Television History / End of the Tunnel, The (1973 - 1975)
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after he had refused to accept the draft brought about by Dr. Kissinger at the end of 1972, but in practical terms Enhance Plus Program didn't represent as much in terms of military value to the South Vietnamese because it was, it was quite a kind of heterogeneous equipment brought from Iran, brought, . Can you describe what happened in March 1965 and how the Americans arrived without any consultation or prior knowledge of the South Vietnamese government? Phone rings in background. Take it off. Camera roll. Mark it. Slate 2. Take 1, ...July when another, when there was another big American buildup? Yes, in July 1965 I remember that ah, President Johnson by this time decided to send to South Vietnam more than 150,000 troops. I was at this time, ah, Special Assistant to Prime
Summary
South Vietnam’s Ambassador to the United States under President Nguyen Van Thieu, Bui Diem recounts the American arrival in March 1965, the troop build up the following July, and the impact this had on South Vietnam.
Date Created
06/03/1981
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Vietnam: A Television History / Vietnamizing the War (1968 - 1973)
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. If Watergate had not occurred, I still believe that there would have been Congressional action to preclude the kind of military support which was necessary to help South Vietnam. Watergate may have had an impact, but there was still this tremendous anti-Vietnam war reaction that was reflected in the Congress, went down to the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue and opposed the War Powers Resolution because it was impractical on the one hand and, I think, unconstitutional on the other. I still believe today that Congress ought to either repeal the War Powers Resolution or significantly, in August of 1974, I wrote the heads of state or the heads of government of all of our allies, including President Thieu of Vietnam. In the particular case of the letter to President Thieu, I reaffirmed US support for the South Vietnamese in a very general way, but I specifically indicated that I
Summary
Gerald R. Ford had been president of the United States for nine months when in 1975, Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, fell to the North Vietnamese, effectively ending US military involvement in Vietnam. He frames the closing of the war in terms of diplomacy—both between the United States and the South Vietnam and between the executive branch and Congress... more
Date Created
04/29/1982
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Vietnam: A Television History / End of the Tunnel, The (1973 - 1975)
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to another place where we had to dig and then pull up the corpses again. 583 on the end Clapstick
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Thruong Yem describes being forced by American soldiers to exhume mass graves in Thuy Bo in 1967.
Date Created
03/03/1981
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. When did you go South, and how long did you remain there? And how did you feel going South. I went to the South in 1967 and stayed there for 9 years. My feeling was to go there in order to help liberate the South, drive away the imperialists, and regain independence and freedom for the nation. How often did you get news from your family? I arrived in the South in 1967, but it was not until 1969 that I received the first letter
Summary
Nguyen Van Nghi served as a soldier in the National Liberation Front in South Vietnam. He describes events during the Tet Offensive, the three-man cell formation of combat during the war, and the support of South Vietnamese villagers for NLF troops. Finally, he comments on his reunion with his family at the end of the war after a 9-year absence.
Date Created
02/10/1981
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the cease fire, we believed that the South Vietnamese had a bit the better of it in the final jockeying for position and that ah and that the outlook for them was ah was ah a hopeful one. However, we caveated it and we said in the end things will still seem to turn on the Americans, it by themselves they could do a lot? But, but in the end, in the end, they would need to count on the Americans. Uh, why couldn't they do it? Uh, the North had, had nothing like the resources at its disposition that we gave to the South. Uh, and I think the answers, as close as I can get, fire, we said we thought the South Vietnamese had a little bit the better of it, ah, in the positioning that had gone one but that ah in the long run, it was still going to depend on ah on on the Americans and ah that this is what the South Vietnamese believed. And, that if, if, if things went badly
Summary
Richard Moose was on the staff of the United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 1969 – 1975. He describes his mission in Vietnam after the ceasefire in 1974 to assess the situation of how the South Vietnamese were positioned in terms of military equipment provided by the Americans and the possibilities of South Vietnam’s survival... more
Date Created
10/23/1981
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VIETNAM PROJECT FINAL DAYS Col. Le Gro SR 454 This is the 13th of November, 1981 and we’re in the Presidio in San Francisco for the Vietnam Project for WGBH in Boston. I have been told the correct way to slate for this is the Vietnam Project TVP013. Elizabeth Deane producer, Final Days, . I really believe that the Secretary did the best possible job, but leaving large North Vietnamese regular formations in the South was a situation that the South could not contend with. They couldn't defeat those major formations, and those major formations had the capability, from the very beginning, furthermore denied the South Vietnamese, because they had no capability essentially, any means to counter North Vietnamese continued buildup in the North. In other words, the territory North of the Demilitarized Zone was sacrosanct. The United States agreed not to continue any military action against
Summary
William E. Le Gro was a colonel in Vietnam and author of "Vietnam from Cease-Fire to Capitulation." Le Gro reports that he felt the Paris Peace Accord was doomed from the start, at least in terms of maintaining a cease fire, but that its purpose for the United States—to disengage the US from Vietnam and to ensure the return of American prisoners of war—was a success... more
Date Created
11/03/1981
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Vietnam: A Television History / End of the Tunnel, The (1973 - 1975)
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, who made up the South Vietnamese opposition at the end of the Vietnam War? A certain number of people, some of whom were extremely sympathetic, extremely brilliant, honest, patriotic, yet who along with the rest, was that the Republic of Vietnam, South Vietnam- given the position of Thieu's government- was bound to suffer progressive disintegration. Little by little, bit by bit, towards what it was difficult to predict. And in a corner lay, reaction, snowball, which would lead to rapid crumbling of the regime. It was an hypothesis that I always had in mind, because without going too far back into the history of South Vietnam, in 1972 there was a communist
Summary
French Diplomat Pierre Brochand served in Saigon and describes the last days of the American presence there. He discusses the failed opposition movement in South Vietnam, and recalls chaotic scenes during the fall of Saigon and the American evacuation.
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GI's in Vietnam listen to Richard M. Nixon speech proposing cease-fire: troops of 4th cavalry 25th division gathered around a radio, large group fills the screen with khaki, very good shot. Nixon's voice heard: "...propose that all forces throughout IC cease firing their weapons...a ceasefire in place...an end to the killing.." Med. shots and close-ups. Strong sense of the troops, different races, bare chests, khaki. Visual of radios. At end of speech, music again on radio as group breaks up. Good atmosphere.
Date Created
10/08/1970
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American Experience / Nixon
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SR 2040 Beep tone. Roll 40 of Vietnam Project, 7860 328. Interview with MAJ. GEN. TRAN DO Clapstick Could you tell us how you went South in 1965? When in 1965 did you join COSVN? And could you describe COSVN, what it was like, where it was located and how life was? As I have just told you, by 1964 the Americans already carried out an extremely fierce Special War in the South. The population in the South suffered heavy casualties as they themselves had to organize armed units in order to resist the American aggressors. In face of this situation, the Central Committee of our Party decided that it was necessary to give support to the people in the South and help them to organize their armed struggles against the Americans. To this end, it was necessary
Summary
Major General Tran Do describes the organization and location of the Central Office for South Vietnam (COSVN), which helped direct Viet Cong and People’s Army of Vietnam efforts in South Vietnam. He recalls the American Operation Junction City, which failed to destroy the COSVN and the Viet Cong’s successful strategy of close combat fighting. Finally, he discusses the objectives and outcomes of the Tet Offensive in 1968.
Date Created
02/17/1981
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Vietnam: A Television History / Tet, 1968