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Agreement was signed, there was the decision to have the Communists withdraw to the north. That is to say, you go back to where you come from. Those people who wanted to have freedom should go to the south to live, below, that the Americans would not dare to carry the war to the North or to Communist China. So naturally they went on fighting and creating problems for the South. The American people, in the meantime, were quite opposed to the war, . What did this Agreement to Vietnam? We saw all kinds of disadvantages to South Vietnam. After the signing of the Agreement, the Communists continue to bring all kinds of weapons and ammunition into the South
Summary
General Tran Van Nhut discusses the effects of the Paris Peace Agreement, Watergate, and the withdrawal of American troops on South Vietnam. He describes the South’s continued efforts to thwart the North at the end of the War. Finally, he recounts the surrender of General Minh in 1975 and describes life under Communist rule in Vietnam.
Date Created
11/11/1981
Media
Video, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / End of the Tunnel, The (1973 - 1975)
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. When did you go South, and how long did you remain there? And how did you feel going South. I went to the South in 1967 and stayed there for 9 years. My feeling was to go there in order to help liberate the South, drive away the imperialists, and regain independence and freedom for the nation. How often did you get news from your family? I arrived in the South in 1967, but it was not until 1969 that I received the first letter
Summary
Nguyen Van Nghi served as a soldier in the National Liberation Front in South Vietnam. He describes events during the Tet Offensive, the three-man cell formation of combat during the war, and the support of South Vietnamese villagers for NLF troops. Finally, he comments on his reunion with his family at the end of the war after a 9-year absence.
Date Created
02/10/1981
Media
Video, Transcript
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of them, that while the enemy had shown that he could hit a number of South Vietnamese cities, hard, even after years of bombing, and...of search and destroy missions and all the rest of it, that he could still come out...that...that, that was terribly depressing uh, to me, at any rate. But the word came back from the embassy that, in fact, it had been a great victory for our side. The, the enemy had lost these assets, the South Vietnamese, . The cables flowed through from the military headquarters and from the Embassy in Saigon saying that we’re, we have survived, the South Vietnamese have survived, the enemy has suffered a terrible defeat, he made a great
Summary
Harry McPherson served as Special Counsel to LBJ from 1965 to 1969 and was Johnson’s chief speechwriter from 1966 to 1969. McPherson begins the interview by recalling the conflicted mood at the White House following the Tet Offensive. The optimism found in military cables and official information clashed with televised images showing the nation that the war was resulting in massive loss of human life and that a prisoner could be shot at point-blank range... more
Date Created
04/23/1981
Media
Video, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / Tet, 1968
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, who made up the South Vietnamese opposition at the end of the Vietnam War? A certain number of people, some of whom were extremely sympathetic, extremely brilliant, honest, patriotic, yet who along with the rest, was that the Republic of Vietnam, South Vietnam- given the position of Thieu's government- was bound to suffer progressive disintegration. Little by little, bit by bit, towards what it was difficult to predict. And in a corner lay, reaction, snowball, which would lead to rapid crumbling of the regime. It was an hypothesis that I always had in mind, because without going too far back into the history of South Vietnam, in 1972 there was a communist
Summary
French Diplomat Pierre Brochand served in Saigon and describes the last days of the American presence there. He discusses the failed opposition movement in South Vietnam, and recalls chaotic scenes during the fall of Saigon and the American evacuation.
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Video, Transcript
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Summary
GI's in Vietnam listen to Richard M. Nixon speech proposing cease-fire: troops of 4th cavalry 25th division gathered around a radio, large group fills the screen with khaki, very good shot. Nixon's voice heard: "...propose that all forces throughout IC cease firing their weapons...a ceasefire in place...an end to the killing.." Med. shots and close-ups. Strong sense of the troops, different races, bare chests, khaki. Visual of radios. At end of speech, music again on radio as group breaks up. Good atmosphere.
Date Created
10/08/1970
Media
Video
Program
American Experience / Nixon
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the right and wrong of the US commitment in Vietnam for more than indicated between the '65 and til the end in '75. But, eh, I would like to stress the point of view of a Vietnamese who look at the problem and who happen to have ah participated here in Washington in many of the developments at this time. Let us put aside the problem of right and wrong of the US commitment in South Vietnam. But, from the point of view of the Vietnamese, we would say that we think the US in terms of a responsible great nation whether it was wrong or right, we hoped and we believe strongly by then that the United States would believe as a respectable nation. Suppose that you are wrong by this time, you cannot say after committing the more than half a million troops in South Vietnam and well, putting the whole house in shambles and say that well, we are wrong. Let us ah call it quits and you leave
Summary
Former South Vietnam ambassador to the United States, Bui Diem recalls the tension between South Vietnam and the United States post 1975. Bui Diem discusses President Nguyen Van Thieu’s growing isolation from the United States and the trouble Bui Diem experienced as he tried to improve the image of South Vietnam.
Date Created
10/23/1981
Media
Video, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / End of the Tunnel, The (1973 - 1975)
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the resignation of my brother had created somewhat strained relations between them. And it was this way that things were arranged, right, at the end of '53, beginning of '54, ? No. The easiest way to tell you about the situation in Vietnam is perhaps to tell you my impressions of the first time I cam back to Vietnam, right. It was the end of August, convinced that the end was near, that the advance, the conquest of the Communists would be soon. So that the administrators had no intention of working, and everybody tried to figure out how they were going to escape
Summary
Brother of Ngo Dinh Diem, Ngo Dinh Luyen was appointed ambassador to the United Kingdom. Ngo Dinh Luyen recounts why Bao Dai chose Ngo Dinh Diem to be the first president of South Vietnam. Ngo Dinh Luyen describes the panic in South Vietnam around August 1954 due to the advancing Communist forces... more
Date Created
01/31/1979
Media
Video, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / America's Mandarin (1954 - 1963)
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lay in the fact that it started too late. In our observations, all the programs from the beginning until the end were all started too late. For this reason, when we received the units and the equipment we were unable, that infiltration effectively. The reason being the extremely limited capability of the air force. As I have said, there was no way to stop the blatant... uh... infiltration from the North to the South at a high rate in the effort to occupy the South. The Vietnamese Air Force could not have stopped that infiltration. Even the American army and air force had been unsuccessful in this effort during the war years, and so, in my opinion, the Vietnamese
Summary
Phan Phung Tien was a member of South Vietnam’s air force during the Vietnam War. He speaks to the difficulty of getting military supplies following the Paris Agreement. He also notes that comments from American Congressmen were detrimental to their efforts, and that the resignation of President Nixon had also boosted the confidence of the North Vietnamese... more
Date Created
11/11/1981
Media
Video, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / End of the Tunnel (1973 - 1975)
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, that we had pacified the whole South with this Strategic Hamlets Programs and in spite of that seeing that they have lost the guerrilla, the subversive war, the Communists dare not to escalate and since dare, and England to put an end before its time to the legislature. Never. They have to coexist until their respective term. The people cannot be summoned because the two cannot get along. We find that too, treaty of Paris has no other purpose than to assure to Vietnam as a whole — north and south — its right to recover under international grants its legitimate power. The Paris Agreement cannot therefore, serve
Summary
As the sister-in-law of President Diem, Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu was considered the first lady of South Vietnam in the late 1950s through the early 1960s. Here she argues that the Diem government was the only legitimate government in South Vietnam, that they were undermined by the United States and that the United States, therefore, paid a price. She discusses the Buddhist Crisis of 1963 and the results of the Paris Peace Accords... more
Date Created
02/11/1982
Media
Video, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / America's Mandarin (1954 - 1963)
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of Vietnam, South Vietnam would occur, probably by the end of 1965 or early 1966. Ah. We felt that the, the situation in Vietnam was so weak and the, the North Vietnamese exploitation of that weakness was such that they, the victory would have been to the enemy, unless we put substantial U.S. combat forces in to establish a screen behind which something could be built in South Vietnam. We Americans had brought about chaos by the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem - I think the most stupid thing we did in Vietnam. But nonetheless, the fact was ah that we felt that if you put troops, do to the north what they were doing to our friends in the south, and ah, that the vehicle was the bombing. I always thought that the key to the war in Vietnam was in the villages of Vietnam, that to the degree to which the villagers took their own responsibility to protect themselves you would
Summary
William Colby was a high-ranking CIA officer during the Vietnam War. He would later direct the Agency. Here he recalls the CIA’s assessment of the Vietnam War in 1965 and the failure of the US to anticipate the Tet Offensive. He discusses the Phoenix Program, which he directed, describing its impact on the War. Finally, he recounts events surrounding the Fall of Saigon and the end of the War, and reflects on the success or failure of US strategy in Vietnam.
Date Created
07/16/1981
Media
Video, Transcript