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Summary
In June 1963 the Education Committee of the Boston Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) presented the Boston School Committee with a 14-Point Proposal to end de facto segregation in the public schools... more
Date Created
9/6/1963
Media
Audio
Program
Boston School Committee Report On Sit-ins
Preview
Summary
In June 1963 the Education Committee of the Boston Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) presented the Boston School Committee with a 14-Point Proposal to end de facto segregation in the public schools. The contentious and failed negotiations precipitated a series of nonviolent, direct action demonstrations in Boston, not the least of which was the June 18, 1963 Stay Out for Freedom Day... more
Date Created
6/17/1963
Media
Audio
Program
Stay Out For Freedom / Boycott Report
Preview
Summary
In June 1963 the Education Committee of the Boston Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) presented the Boston School Committee with a 14-Point Proposal to end defacto segregation in the public schools. The contentious and failed negotiations precipitated a series of nonviolent, direct action demonstrations in Boston that also drew comparisons with the civil rights struggles, particularly in Birmingham, Alabama... more
Date Created
9/22/1963
Media
Audio
Preview
Summary
In June 1963 the Education Committee of the Boston Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) presented the Boston School Committee with a 14-Point Proposal to end de facto segregation in the public schools. The contentious and failed negotiations precipitated a series of nonviolent, direct action demonstrations in Boston, not the least of which was the June 18, 1963 Stay Out for Freedom Day... more
Date Created
6/18/1963
Media
Audio
Program
Stay Out For Freedom / Reaction to Boycott Report
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Text
the point of view of the uh South Vietnamese uh government uh you know rather uh than from the uh point of view of the United States government. You know, again, that's a hard thing to do, but as an advisor I think you ought to uh, you know, use the point of view of how do the people, . Well, here we are and you're, despite your looking at this from a, trying to look at it from a South Vietnamese point of view. Nevertheless, you're an American and you come from one kind of culture, they're Vietnamese and they come from another kind of culture. As you approach the problem, let's try to be specific, and went into a hamlet or a number of hamlets, what kinds of problems did you encounter as two cultures try to work side by side? Well, you know, it's very difficult uh you know to put yourself in uh as an America into the South
Summary
Robert Montague was a General in the United States Army. He first went to Vietnam in 1963 and was involved in the early planning of the war. In 1966, he was a Director of the Office of Civil Operations, focusing on the American effort of pacification. He discusses his reservations about the military escalation of US forces into South Vietnam, and his role in creating the estimates for General Westmoreland regarding the decision of whether or not to escalate... more
Date Created
08/26/1982
Media
Audio, Transcript
Preview
Text
Nguyen TinhSpeed. Rolling. Uh, Slate 87. Clapstick. Uh, my father used to be a soldier in the National Army before 197—54, that mean before we had a big exodus from the North to the South. When we got to the South, I, uh, went to school and after graduated from the College of Science, I was a high school teacher, that before 1974. And after 1974, when the Communists took over South, uh, Vietnam, I uh, didn't go to teach anymore because I can see that they had a lot of discrimination policy, so, uh, um, I uh, stay home and tried to plan with my family to escape because the situation in Viet, in South Vietnam is worse and worse. We had, uh, very difficult in moving around, very difficult in economic life, and especially about cultural life. It, uh, terrible. Uh
Summary
Nguyen Tinh was a high school teacher in South Vietnam, but fled to the United States after the Communist victory. He established the Nationalist Vietnamese Association to oppose Communism in Vietnam from the U.S. He describes the history and purpose of this organization, and the challenges faced by Vietnamese now living in the United States. He talks about the resistance movement both within and outside of Vietnam. He explains why it was good for America to be involved in the war, and why that involvement should have continued until the Communists were defeated.
Media
Audio, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / Legacies
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Summary
WGBH news commentator, Louis Lyons conducts a panel discussion on civil rights issues in Boston following Medgar Evers Memorial Rally held earlier on the Boston Common. His guests include: Ted Poston, reporter, New York Post; Professor Mark DeWolfe Howe, Harvard Law School; Noel Day, Director, St... more
Date Created
6/26/1963
Media
Audio
Program
Civil Rights Panel With Louis Lyons
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Summary
In 1964, despite a year of sustained efforts by the NAACP, parents, and other civil rights activists, the Boston Public Schools remained racially segregated. Citizens for Human Rights (CHR), the group that organized the Boston’s successful 1963 Stay Out for Freedom, led by Reverend James Breeden and Noel Day, evolved into the Massachusetts Freedom Movement (MFM)... more
Date Created
2/26/1964
Media
Audio
Preview
Text
. Specifically, what were you doing? What was your life like? I was the... I was drafted in 1968 as a officer of the South Vietnam government and I was training through the Officer Academy, . I was drafted in 1968 and became officer of the South Vietnam government and 1970 I was graduated and became a pilot. What did you do thereafter? What kinds of planes did, to you after the end of April, 1975? Right after April, 1975 I was called and report to the Communist post and they send me to the reeducation camp
Summary
Phuong Doan was a helicopter pilot for the Army of South Vietnam from 1970 – 1975. He recalls that after the 1975 fall of Saigon, he reported to the Communists and was sent to a re-education camp where he remained for over four years in brutal conditions. Mr. Doan tells of his escape in 1979 to Saigon, and his eventual escape to the Philippines. He concludes with his reflections of the war, and his desire to return to Vietnam some day to live with the family he left behind.
Date Created
07/20/1983
Media
Audio, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / Legacies
Preview
Text
organizations were actually slow in getting to what was a terrible, terrible situation. What were some of the kinds of things that refugees were beginning to report by the end of 1975, that there would be a bloodbath in South Vietnam if the North Vietnamese won the war. There were not similar predictions, so far as I know, made about Cambodia. How do you account for the fact that the result was almost the opposite of the expectation, , extreme... Out of film Also, maybe we ought to try to be quiet. End of Sound Roll 24
Summary
David R. Hawk is a human rights activist and researcher, having served at Executive Director of Amnesty International and a director of the United Nations human rights office. He was a civic rights activist in college and graduate school at the time of the escalation of the Vietnam War. He describes his human rights work in Cambodia in the mid-1970’s, including the “extreme measures” being taken by the Khmer Rouge on its own population... more
Date Created
07/29/1983
Media
Audio, Transcript
Program
Vietnam: A Television History / Legacies