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Urban youth study karate

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Summary
Christy George reports that Ernie Branch (karate instructor) teaches karate to urban kids. George interviews Branch, who talks about the value of karate. Branch says that hard work, dedication, and concentration are all important in karate. George's report includes footage of Branch in class with a group of kids. George interviews the children in Branch's class about why they like karate and about what they would like to be when they grow up. George reports that Branch's karate classes are funded by the Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency (MHFA). George interviews Haroldine Haley (parent) and Michael Langelow (parent) about the benefits of the karate classes.

Topics
Sports, Urban youth, Massachusetts Housing Finance Authority
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Log

0:59:58: Visual: Footage of minority youth in a karate class. Shots of individual youth as they perform their exercises. Shot of Ernie Branch (karate instructor). Christy George reports that Branch is a volunteer; that Branch is also a father and a former marine. V: Footage of Branch counting out loud as the youth do their exercises. Shots of individual youth in the class. Branch circulates among the class members. Footage of Branch being interviewed. Branch says that young kids have not yet decided if they want to be "good guys" or "bad guys." Branch says that the "good guys" do not offer any incentives; that the "bad guys" do offer incentives. Branch says that kids must learn that short term greed does not pay off in the end. Branch says that he tries to teach kids that hard work, dedication, and concentration will pay off. Branch says that kids need to learn how to think. George reports that Branch teaches karate to kids; that karate is a form of self-defense; that karate teaches confidence, structure, and self-respect. V: Branch instructs the members of the class to sit down. They sit down. Shots of individual members of the class. A young African American boy performs exercises in front of the class. Footage of Branch being interviewed. Branch says that major sports like basketball and football do not appeal to all kids. Branch says that some kids who fail in other sports find success in karate. Branch says that there is no failure in karate; that kids can progress at their own rate of speed; that kids receive individual attention. Footage of the members of the class being interviewed by George. George asks what karate teaches them about not fighting. King Branch (age eleven) says that karate has taught him that people will make trouble for you if you make trouble for them. King Branch says that he does not want to be the one who starts a fight; that he might be the one who gets beat up. Footage of Nathaniel Pomales (age eleven) says that it is important to remember hand blocks so that others cannot hit you. George remarks that karate requires a lot of concentration. Pomales says that he keeps it all in his head. Footage of Camille Langelow (age nine) saying that she has learned discipline and how to stand up for herself. Footage of James Haley (age nine) saying that karate has taught him to avoid bad behavior; that he usually has bad behavior. Footage of Andrew Cherry (age ten) saying that karate has taught him to avoid fights; that karate has taught him to ignore what others say about him. George reports that two of the children in Branch's class have special needs; that they are overactive and have trouble concentrating. George notes that these students have no problem in Branch's class. V: Shot of Branch instructing the members of the class as they do their exercises. Footage of Haroldine Haley (mother of James Haley) sitting with James Haley. Haroldine Haley says that she used to have trouble getting James Haley to do his homework. Haroldine Haley says that she told James Haley that he could not go to karate if his homework is not finished. Haroldine Haley says that James Haley always has his homework done before karate now. George reports that Haroldine Haley and Michael Langelow (father of Camille Langelow) think that parents need to be more involved with their children. Footage of Michael Langelow sitting with Camille Langelow. Michael Langelow says that kids are being destroyed by drugs, gangs, and violence. Michael Langelow says that parents need to be responsible for their children. Shots of two members of the class performing exercises in front of the others. George reports that Branch's karate classes are funded by the Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency (MHFA); that the MHFA finances low-interest mortgages for low-income housing. George reports that the MHFA has found that the best way to protect its real estate is to protect the tenants. George notes that the MHFA conducts classes and counseling in areas including substance abuse, single parenting, suicide prevention, and karate. V: Shot of Branch demonstrating hand movements for the class. Footage of Pomales saying that he wants to be a scientist and an astronaut when he grows up; of Cherry saying that he would like to be a basketball player. Footage of a young girl in the class saying that she would like to be a doctor. Footage of Camille Langelow saying that she would like to be a runner or another kind of athlete. Footage of King Branch saying that he would like to be a US Marine sergeant. Shots of the students in karate class. George says that not all kids have someone who cares about them. V: Footage of Ernie Branch being interviewed. Branch says that he cares about youth because they represent the future. Shots of the students performing exercises in unison. Branch corrects one of the girls in class.