open Vault

WGBH Media Library and Archives

Jackie Robinson [Tape 2 of 3]

  • Cite

Summary
This tape features Marcus Jones' second report in a three-part series on the life of Jackie Robinson (baseball player) in honor of the fortieth anniversary of Robinson's entry into major league baseball. Jones reports on Robinson's career after baseball and his active participation in the civil rights movement. Jones notes that Robinson was the first African American to reach the level of vice-president in a major corporation when he was named to that post at the Chock Full O'Nuts company. Jones reviews Robinson's role in the civil rights movement and his political activity during the 1960 presidential elections. Jones reports that Robinson co-founded the Freedom National Bank in Harlem in 1963, which was the first bank in the US to be run by African Americans. Jones talks about Robinson's disappointment when white teammates from professional baseball refused to join him for the March on Washington in 1963. Jones' report includes footage from interviews with Rachel Robinson (wife of Jackie Robinson), Ambassador Franklin Williams (friend of Jackie Robinson), Mal Goode (journalist), and Clem Labine (former Brooklyn Dodger). Jones' report also features footage of the civil rights movements and footage of Robinson in the 1960s. Jones' report includes footage from the film Jackie Robinson: An American Journey. Tape 2 of 3.
Topics
African American athletes, African Americans--Civil rights, Baseball, Sports, Segregation, Civil rights, Brooklyn Dodgers (Baseball team), Freedom National Bank (New York, N.Y.), Major League Baseball (Organization)
Tags (0)
Add Tag Add Annotation

Log

1:00:01: Visual: Footage of Jackie Robinson walking off of a baseball field. Text on screen reads, "Jackie Robinson's American Dream." Black and white shot of an older Robinson waving goodbye; of the exterior of Ebbets Field; of a newspaper headline reading, "Giants get Robinson." Shot of a black and white photo of Robinson in a suit. Marcus Jones reports that Jackie Robinson left baseball in 1957; that Robinson chose to retire instead of be traded to the New York Giants. Jones reports that Robinson signed on as vice-president of personnel for Chock full o'Nuts company; that Robinson was the first African American to reach the level of vice-president in a major corporation. V: Black and white footage of Robinson in a baseball uniform; of Robinson in a business suit; of a sign for "Chock full o'Nuts." Black and white footage of Robinson with his employees; of Robinson meeting with a group of people. Jones reports that Robinson played an active role in the civil rights movement. V: Footage of Rachel Robinson (Jackie Robinson's wife) saying that Robinson wanted to be a part of the civil rights movement. Black and white footage of African American students integrating white schools; of African American picketers outside of a Woolworth lunch counter; of an African American man confronting a police officer; of Martin Luther King (civil rights leader); of an African American man being pushed by white men; of fire hoses being used on African American demonstrators; of African American picketers with protest signs. Footage of Ambassador Franklin Williams (friend of Robinson) saying that Robinson identified with the NAACP; that Robinson was an active chairman of the Freedom Fund Campaign. Jones reports that Robinson advocated equal opportunities for African Americans in all areas; that Robinson's stature drew attention to the cause. V: Footage from Jackie Robinson: An American Journey. Footage shows Robinson campaigning for civil rights. Robinson rides in a convertible through an African American neighborhood. Footage of Williams saying that Robinson drew great crowds; that women would pay to have him kiss them on the cheek. Footage of a Nelson Rockefeller presidential campaign rally in 1960. Robinson is visible in the crowd. Jones reports that Robinson supported Nelson Rockefeller (presidential candidate) in 1960; that Robinson campaigned for the Republican nominee Richard Nixon (1960 Republican presidential nominee) after Rockefeller lost the nomination. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Nixon and Robinson. Footage of Williams saying that Robinson believed that African Americans would be strengthened if they were represented by both of the major parties. Footage of a campaign debate in 1960 between Nixon and John F. Kennedy (1960 Democratic presidential nominee). Footage of Williams saying that Robinson had great respect for Nixon at the beginning of the 1960 presidential campaign; that Robinson eventually became disillusioned with the Republican Party. Shot of a black and white photo of Nixon and Robinson. Black and white footage of Kennedy's inaugural speech. Jones reports that Robinson continued to fight for equality for African Americans; that Robinson pushed for Mal Goode (journalist) to be hired as the first African American TV news correspondent. V: Shots of black and white photos of Robinson; of Robinson and Goode. Footage of Goode reflecting on the sacrifices made by the previous generation of African Americans. Jones reports that Robinson co-founded Freedom National Bank in Harlem in 1963; that the bank was the first bank to be run by African Americans. V: Shots of Freedom National Bank in Harlem. Black and white footage of Robinson talking about the importance of Freedom National Bank. Jones stands in front of Freedom National Bank. Jones reports that Robinson worked to free the African American community from the constraints of racism. V: Footage of Williams talking about the idea of a bank run by African Americans, in which whites could participate. Black and white footage of Robinson talking about the importance of registering African Americans to vote. Black and white footage of African Americans marching in the South in 1963; of whites standing behind a Confederate flag; of two white men waving a small Confederate flag. Jones reports that Robinson spent a lot of time in the South in 1963. V: Black and white footage of Robinson and King; of Robinson addressing a crowd about the need for equal rights. Shots of a black and white photo of King. Black and white shot of Robinson picking up a telephone. Black and white aerial shot of the March on Washington in 1963. Jones reports that Robinson was disappointed when his white Dodger teammates refused to join him for the March on Washington in 1963. V: Footage of Clem Labine (former Brooklyn Dodger) saying that he regrets not joining Robinson for the March on Washington. Black and white shot of Robinson addressing a crowd. Jones reports that Robinson started a construction company in 1970; that the company was dedicated to building low-income housing. V: Shots of Robinson at a construction site; of Robinson looking at architectural plans; of Robinson throwing out a baseball at a ballgame. Jones reports that Robinson died in October of 1972. Jones stands outside of Ebbets Field Apartments. Jones says that Robinson's ideals still live on.