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Two Centuries of Symphony; Classical First Movement, The

Approximate date: 1959


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Series
Two Centuries of Symphony
Program
Classical First Movement, The
Program Number

101

Series Description

20 programs to the series. This series will deal with the symphony as musical composition. It will feature Mr. G. Wallace Woodworth, Professor of Music and Lowell Television Lecturer at Harvard University. The format will be lecture-demonstration utilizing piano, recordings, and orchestras ranging from 13 to 26 players. Orchestras, of the sizes indicated, will be employed on program numbers 4 (13), 5 (17), and 20 (26).

The purpose of the series is to analyze the four movements of the symphony as expressed in the Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary schools of music in such a way to make the viewers attendance at symphonies more meaningful.

The literature of the symphony orchestra has been the mainstream of musical art in modern times. The symphony is the largest, and possibly the most characteristic form of musical expression during the last two centuries. It has a continuous history, reflecting the changing styles of classical, romantic and contemporary art. This series has two objectives: first, to help listeners to listen intelligently and thereby to increase their enjoyment of symphonic music; second, to survey the main currents in the development of musical style through representative works from symphonic literature. The first ten programs are devoted to the classical symphonies of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, in the period when the new form was created, developed and perfected. The remaining programs show the continuous life of the symphony through the romantic period, the outburst of national schools, and the conflicting currents of 20th Century art. The last three programs are devoted to the American symphony. Four programs are illustrated by the Cambridge Festival Orchestra. The other illustrations are drawn from recorded music. The visual aids include symphonic scores, diagrams, and outlines of many kinds. Rear-screen projection of scores enables the viewer to watch both the conductor and the music as a work is being performed.

Professor G. Wallace Woodworth has taught music at Harvard University since 1926. Formerly director of the Harvard Glee Club and the Radcliffe Choral Society, he has led the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, and collegiate orchestras. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Musicological Society, an honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa, and a member of the Board of the RCA-Victor Society of Great Music. Series release date: 1959

Program Description

Series Description: 20 programs to the series. This series will deal with the symphony as musical composition. It will feature Mr. G. Wallace Woodworth, Professor of Music and Lowell Television Lecturer at Harvard University. The format will be lecture-demonstration utilizing piano, recordings, and orchestras ranging from 13 to 26 players. Orchestras, of the sizes indicated, will be employed on program numbers 4 (13), 5 (17), and 20 (26).

The purpose of the series is to analyze the four movements of the symphony as expressed in the Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary schools of music in such a way to make the viewers attendance at symphonies more meaningful.

The literature of the symphony orchestra has been the mainstream of musical art in modern times. The symphony is the largest, and possibly the most characteristic form of musical expression during the last two centuries. It has a continuous history, reflecting the changing styles of classical, romantic and contemporary art. This series has two objectives: first, to help listeners to listen intelligently and thereby to increase their enjoyment of symphonic music; second, to survey the main currents in the development of musical style through representative works from symphonic literature. The first ten programs are devoted to the classical symphonies of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, in the period when the new form was created, developed and perfected. The remaining programs show the continuous life of the symphony through the romantic period, the outburst of national schools, and the conflicting currents of 20th Century art. The last three programs are devoted to the American symphony. Four programs are illustrated by the Cambridge Festival Orchestra. The other illustrations are drawn from recorded music. The visual aids include symphonic scores, diagrams, and outlines of many kinds. Rear-screen projection of scores enables the viewer to watch both the conductor and the music as a work is being performed.

Professor G. Wallace Woodworth has taught music at Harvard University since 1926. Formerly director of the Harvard Glee Club and the Radcliffe Choral Society, he has led the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, and collegiate orchestras. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Musicological Society, an honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa, and a member of the Board of the RCA-Victor Society of Great Music.

Asset Type

Broadcast program

Media Type

Video

Genres
Educational
Performance in a Studio
Topics
Music
Creators
Whitelaw, Jordan (Series Producer)
Citation
Chicago: “Two Centuries of Symphony; Classical First Movement, The,” WGBH Media Library & Archives, accessed December 2, 2016, http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_E5A8E5AE35834796B179ECD291C03B3A.
MLA: “Two Centuries of Symphony; Classical First Movement, The.” WGBH Media Library & Archives. Web. December 2, 2016. <http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_E5A8E5AE35834796B179ECD291C03B3A>.
APA: Two Centuries of Symphony; Classical First Movement, The. Boston, MA: WGBH Media Library & Archives. Retrieved from http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_E5A8E5AE35834796B179ECD291C03B3A
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