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NOVA ScienceNow; What Are Animals Thinking

10/16/2012

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Series
NOVA ScienceNow
Program
What Are Animals Thinking
Program Number

605

Series Description

Premiered January 2005 NOVA scienceNOW is a new series produced by NOVA. For more than three decades, NOVA has been unrivaled in bringing authoritative, innovative, and entertaining science documentaries to television. Now the same award-winning producers have teamed up with veteran reporter Robert Krulwich to cover the timeliest developments and intriguing personalities in science and technology today. Presenting multiple stories in a magazine format hosted by Krulwich and reported by a diverse team of correspondents in the field, NOVA scienceNOW will air five times a year in the NOVA time slot.

NOVA scienceNOW has named Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, respected scientist, author, and director of the Hayden Planetarium in the Rose Center For Earth and Space at the American Museum of Natural History, to host the science magazine series with the launch of its second season in the Fall of 2006. Series release date: 1/25/2005

Program Description

Have you ever wondered what’s going on inside an animal’s head? How do they see the world — and us? Is your dog really feeling guilty when it gives you that famous “guilty look?” Do pigeon brains possess “superpowers” that allow them to find their way home across hundreds of unfamiliar miles? David meets — and competes — with a menagerie of smart critters that challenge preconceived notions about what makes “us” different from “them,” expanding our understanding of how animals really think.

Profile: Laurie Santos Laurie Santos studies primate psychology and monkeynomics -- testing problems in human psychology on primates, who (not so surprisingly) have many of the same predictable irrationalities we do. Laurie Santos runs the Comparative Cognition Laboratory (CapLab) at Yale, where she and collaborators across departments (from psychology to primatology to neurobiology) explore the evolutionary origins of the human mind by studying lemurs, capuchin monkeys and other primates. The twist: Santos looks not only for positive humanlike traits, like tool-using and altruism, but irrational ones, like biased decisionmaking.

Profile produced for WBGH by Seftel Productions.

Duration

00:56:40

Asset Type

Broadcast program

Media Type

Video

Genres
Magazine
Topics
Science
Creators
Linde, Olicker (Series Producer)
Citation
Chicago: “NOVA ScienceNow; What Are Animals Thinking,” 10/16/2012, WGBH Media Library & Archives, accessed December 5, 2016, http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_D93810C326E047808F1E6143A85AB998.
MLA: “NOVA ScienceNow; What Are Animals Thinking.” 10/16/2012. WGBH Media Library & Archives. Web. December 5, 2016. <http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_D93810C326E047808F1E6143A85AB998>.
APA: NOVA ScienceNow; What Are Animals Thinking. Boston, MA: WGBH Media Library & Archives. Retrieved from http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_D93810C326E047808F1E6143A85AB998
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