WGBH Openvault

NOVA ScienceNow; How Smart Are Animals

11/17/2010

Packaged Green Label Master


License Clip

More material is available from this program at the WGBH Archive. If you are a researcher interested in accessing the collection at WGBH, please email archive_requests@wgbh.org.

Undigitized item: Request Digitization

Untranscribed item: Request Transcription

Series
NOVA ScienceNow
Program
How Smart Are Animals
Program Number

504

Series Description

Premiered January 2005 NOVA scienceNOW is a new series produced by NOVA. For more than three decades, NOVA has been unrivaled in bringing authoritative, innovative, and entertaining science documentaries to television. Now the same award-winning producers have teamed up with veteran reporter Robert Krulwich to cover the timeliest developments and intriguing personalities in science and technology today. Presenting multiple stories in a magazine format hosted by Krulwich and reported by a diverse team of correspondents in the field, NOVA scienceNOW will air five times a year in the NOVA time slot.

NOVA scienceNOW has named Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, respected scientist, author, and director of the Hayden Planetarium in the Rose Center For Earth and Space at the American Museum of Natural History, to host the science magazine series with the launch of its second season in the Fall of 2006. Series release date: 1/25/2005

Program Description

See Individual Segment Titles for additional assets.

Would you care to match wits with a dog, an octopus, a dolphin, or a parrot? You may think twice after watching the segments in this NOVA scienceNOW episode. While we may not be ready to send pets to Harvard, the remarkable footage and findings presented here demonstrate that many animal species are much smarter than we assume and in ways we had never imagined.

How Smart Are Dogs: New discoveries are revealing that "man's best friend" is smarter than we ever thought, with a brain that resembles our own in ways we never imagined. Travel to Wolf Park, where scientists are tracing the evolutionary path that turned wild animals into our cuddly companions, and meet a superdog with a vocabulary of over 1,000 words.

How Smart are Dolphins: Off the coast of Honduras, on Roatan Island, a legendary experiment in dolphin communication is being attempted for the first time in 20 years—one that could prove that dolphins can, in effect, "speak" with one another to coordinate their behavior. Other studies reveal that these playful marine mammals can plan ahead and problem-solve in ways few other animals can.

Working Title: Dolphin Behavior

How Smart Is an Octopus: Cephalopods—octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish—are some of the weirdest creatures on Earth. They perform fantastic feats of camouflage, boast surprisingly large brains, and can even solve problems—like how to get tasty shrimp out of a twist-top jar. But are these remarkable behaviors truly a sign of intelligence?

Profile: Irene Pepperberg: An unlikely scientific team, Irene Pepperberg and her talking parrot, Alex, revolutionized scientists' ideas about animal communication and intelligence. Yet even after Alex's premature death, Pepperberg still struggles to convince some critics that Alex's accomplishments—counting, reasoning, identifying shapes and colors—are more than mere party tricks.

Duration

00:56:40

Asset Type

Broadcast program

Media Type

Video

Genres
Magazine
Topics
Science
Creators
Linde, Olicker (Series Producer)
Citation
Chicago: “NOVA ScienceNow; How Smart Are Animals,” 11/17/2010, WGBH Media Library & Archives, accessed December 5, 2016, http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_94BCE86423174C20B13569AB914A8611.
MLA: “NOVA ScienceNow; How Smart Are Animals.” 11/17/2010. WGBH Media Library & Archives. Web. December 5, 2016. <http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_94BCE86423174C20B13569AB914A8611>.
APA: NOVA ScienceNow; How Smart Are Animals. Boston, MA: WGBH Media Library & Archives. Retrieved from http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_94BCE86423174C20B13569AB914A8611
If you have more information about this item, we want to know! Please contact us, including the URL.