WGBH Openvault

Say Brother; Malcolm X

Part of From the Vault. Part of Pan-African Liberation.

02/20/1974

The program examines the life and teachings of Malcolm X. It consists of a series of video and audio recordings of the political leader, both in the form of interviews and speeches. Through these segments, Malcolm sets out his view of Black Nationalism and the role of Islamic thought in creating a distinctive African identity within the United States. He urges the creation of a meaningful revolution that can take control of the politics and economics of the black community. He also criticizes the climate of hate created by white society. Footage from later in his life follows Malcolm’s trips overseas and his break with the Nation of Islam, which inspires him to advocate for a more international vision of brotherhood that recognizes the African American problem in the United States as one of human rights. Though still critical of the goal of integration, the segments note his desire for greater black unity, his belief that the government must act in support of black demands in order to retain legitimacy, and the African American right to self-defense. Interspersed with these video segments, Topper Carew hosts a trio of discussions with activists inspired by Malcolm’s life and teachings. John H. Clarke points to Malcolm’s understanding of the African American struggle as international in nature, openly pondering whether his decision to speak about self-determination and develop a more global program led to his death. He uses Malcolm as a platform to discuss black leadership, noting that the future of politics will be more internationally cognizant and focused on capable administration as compared to charismatic speaking. Owusu Sadaukai (Howard Fuller) adds to this discussion, noting that Malcolm’s death inspired him to think more critically about matters of race and inequality. Sadaukai discusses how his ideas have evolved to embrace a scientific socialist reading of history, which helped motivate him to launch African Liberation Day celebrations in 1972. Finally, Bobby Seale of the Black Panthers situates Malcolm X within the ideological context of the Black Panther Party. He explains that the political party aims to meet the immediate needs of the community, explaining that revolution will come after the basic interests of African Americans are met through community programs, organization of voting blocs, and the election of black candidates. Summary and select metadata for this record was submitted by R. Joseph Parrott. Program focuses on the impact of Malcolm X on Black political and intellectual leadership in the United States. Host Topper Carew speaks with Dr. John H. Clarke (historian and Cornell University professor), Owusu Sadauki (National Chairman of the African Liberation Day Committee) and Bobby Seale (cofounder of the Black Panthers) about the impact of Malcolm X's work on their personal ideologies, the opinions of Black Americans, and their struggle for Black rights in the United States. Interviews are separated by segments of archival news footage featuring Malcolm X talking about his political philosophies. Program contains a particularly strong segment from a speech delivered to the students of Selma, Alabama a few weeks before his assassination in 1965. Portions of this program have been edited due to rights restrictions. To see the full episode, please contact the archive.


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Series
Say Brother
Program
Malcolm X
Program Number

317

Series Description

Say Brother is WGBH's longest running public affairs television program by, for and about African Americans, and is now known as Basic Black. Since its inception in 1968, Say Brother has featured the voices of both locally and nationally known African American artists, athletes, performers, politicians, professionals, and writers including: Muhammad Ali, Maya Angelou, Thomas Atkins, Amiri Baraka, Doris Bunte, Julian Bond, Stokely Carmichael, Louis Farrakhan, Nikki Giovanni, Odetta Gordon, Henry Hampton, Benjamin Hooks, Jesse Jackson, Hubie Jones, Mel King, Eartha Kitt, Elma Lewis, Haki Madhubuti, Wallace D. Muhammad, Charles Ogletree, Babatunde Olatunji, Byron Rushing, Owusu Sadaukai, and Sonia Sanchez. Series release date: 7/15/1968

Program Description

Program focuses on the impact of Malcolm X on Black political and intellectual leadership in the United States. Host Topper Carew speaks with Dr. John H. Clarke (historian and Cornell University professor), Owusu Sadauki (National Chairman of the African Liberation Day Committee) and Bobby Seale (cofounder of the Black Panthers) about the impact of Malcolm X's work on their personal ideologies, the opinions of Black Americans, and their struggle for Black rights in the United States. Interviews are separated by segments of archival news footage featuring Malcolm X talking about his political philosophies. Program contains a particularly strong segment from a speech delivered to the students of Selma, Alabama a few weeks before his assassination in 1965.

Asset Type

Broadcast program

Media Type

Video

Subjects
Carew, Topper, 1943-
Boston, Massachusetts
African Liberation - Ideology
United Nations – International Organization
Shabazz, Betty
Human Rights
Race relations – United States
African Liberation Support Committee – Activist Organization
X, Malcolm, 1925-1965
Clarke, John Henrik, 1915-1998
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
Black Power/ Black Nationalism - Ideology
African Liberation Day
Pan-Africanism - Ideology
Black Panther Party – Political Party
Seale, Bobby, 1936-
Genres
Magazine
Topics
Race and Ethnicity
Contributors
Clarke, John Henrik, 1915-1998 (Guest)
Davis, Tony (Assistant Producer)
White, Conrad (Director)
Jones, Vickie (Associate Producer)
Carew, Topper, 1943- (Host)
Fuller, Howard, 1941- (Guest)
Johnson, Henry (Filmmaker)
Seale, Bobby, 1936- (Guest)
Citation
Chicago: “Say Brother; Malcolm X,” 02/20/1974, WGBH Media Library & Archives, accessed December 5, 2016, http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_7211FEA594634BC9B984B4AFA493D446.
MLA: “Say Brother; Malcolm X.” 02/20/1974. WGBH Media Library & Archives. Web. December 5, 2016. <http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_7211FEA594634BC9B984B4AFA493D446>.
APA: Say Brother; Malcolm X. Boston, MA: WGBH Media Library & Archives. Retrieved from http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_7211FEA594634BC9B984B4AFA493D446
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