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NOVA ScienceNow; Where Did We Come From


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NOVA ScienceNow
Where Did We Come From
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Series Description

Premiered January 2005 NOVA scienceNOW is a new series produced by NOVA. For more than three decades, NOVA has been unrivaled in bringing authoritative, innovative, and entertaining science documentaries to television. Now the same award-winning producers have teamed up with veteran reporter Robert Krulwich to cover the timeliest developments and intriguing personalities in science and technology today. Presenting multiple stories in a magazine format hosted by Krulwich and reported by a diverse team of correspondents in the field, NOVA scienceNOW will air five times a year in the NOVA time slot.

NOVA scienceNOW has named Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, respected scientist, author, and director of the Hayden Planetarium in the Rose Center For Earth and Space at the American Museum of Natural History, to host the science magazine series with the launch of its second season in the Fall of 2006. Series release date: 1/25/2005

Program Description

See Individual Segment Titles for additional assets.

In this episode of NOVA scienceNOW, journey back in time to the birth of our solar system to examine whether the key to our planet's existence might have been the explosive shockwave of an ancient supernova. Meet a chemist who has yielded a new kind of "recipe" for natural processes to assemble and create the building blocks of life. And see how the head louse, a creepy critter that's been sucking our blood for millions of years, is offering clues about our evolution. Finally, meet neuroscientist André Fenton, who is looking into erasing painful memories with an injection.

Origins of the Solar System: Combining chemical evidence from meteorites with the latest computer simulations, scientists show how, nearly five billion years ago, a supernova shock wave could have swept through a cloud of dust and gas and caused it to collapse, eventually forming our sun and the planets—if it didn't blow the baby solar system apart first.

Revealing the Origins of Life: Where did the very first living thing on Earth come from? Scientists have long argued that billions of years ago, life emerged on its own—but no one knows exactly how. Now, in a landmark discovery, chemist John Sutherland has created the conditions in which the building blocks of RNA, one of the key molecules of life and the probable precursor to DNA, assemble themselves naturally.

Lice and Human Evolution: Fossils can tell us a lot about human evolution but still leave many questions unanswered. Now, there's another source of information—though it's not for the squeamish. After sucking our blood for millions of years, lice are suddenly proving their value: Their DNA turns out to hold a treasure trove of clues about our evolution.

Profile: Andre Fenton: Can a simple injection erase a painful memory? Neurobiologist Andre Fenton says it can. But Fenton isn't in the business of wiping out personal histories. He hopes that his work can help people struggling with dementia and Alzheimer's, and one day illuminate the biological root of memory itself.



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Broadcast program

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Linde, Olicker (Series Producer)
Chicago: “NOVA ScienceNow; Where Did We Come From,” 12/16/2010, WGBH Media Library & Archives, accessed October 24, 2016, http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_5FCB1DC33EB14903857471443AE47326.
MLA: “NOVA ScienceNow; Where Did We Come From.” 12/16/2010. WGBH Media Library & Archives. Web. October 24, 2016. <http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_5FCB1DC33EB14903857471443AE47326>.
APA: NOVA ScienceNow; Where Did We Come From. Boston, MA: WGBH Media Library & Archives. Retrieved from http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_5FCB1DC33EB14903857471443AE47326
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