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Culture Shock; Hollywood Censored: Movies, Morality and the Production Code

10/28/1999

#3 - Reel 1 of 2 DVS mix on Ch. 3/closed captioned RT: 56:15


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Series
Culture Shock
Program
Hollywood Censored: Movies, Morality and the Production Code
Program Number

103

Series Description

This series tells the stories of classic works of art -- in literature, music, film and painting -- that have been controversial and explores their current relevance. 102 - Hollywood Censored: Movies, Morality & the Production Code/The Devil's Music: 1920s Jazz--The mass appeal of movies, including their graphic portrayals of sex and violence, has made them a target of censors since the early days. In the 1930s, Hollywood studios enforced a set of guidelines for movie content, known as the Production Code, to answer growing charges of immorality. The Code, which lasted for more than 20 years, continues to influence movie making today. As feature films still have the power to provoke controversy, the question remains: Do movies reflect -- or cause -- social behavior? Ellen Barkin narrates. In its early years, jazz faced resistance across America. Like today's rap, jazz was considered a dangerous influence on young people and society. It featured improvisation and the liberating rhythms of the black American experience over classical music forms. As jazz's popularity grew, some fought to suppress the music on moral grounds -- but it finally won acceptance as an art form. Dion Graham narrates. Series release date: 1/2000

Program Description

This series tells the stories of classic works of art -- in literature, music, film and painting -- that have been controversial and explores their current relevance. 102 - Hollywood Censored: Movies, Morality & the Production Code/The Devil's Music: 1920s Jazz--The mass appeal of movies, including their graphic portrayals of sex and violence, has made them a target of censors since the early days. In the 1930s, Hollywood studios enforced a set of guidelines for movie content, known as the Production Code, to answer growing charges of immorality. The Code, which lasted for more than 20 years, continues to influence movie making today. As feature films still have the power to provoke controversy, the question remains: Do movies reflect -- or cause -- social behavior? Ellen Barkin narrates. In its early years, jazz faced resistance across America. Like today's rap, jazz was considered a dangerous influence on young people and society. It featured improvisation and the liberating rhythms of the black American experience over classical music forms. As jazz's popularity grew, some fought to suppress the music on moral grounds -- but it finally won acceptance as an art form. Dion Graham narrates.

Asset Type

Broadcast program

Media Type

Video

Genres
Documentary
Creators
Bemko, Marsha (Series Producer)
Citation
Chicago: “Culture Shock; Hollywood Censored: Movies, Morality and the Production Code,” 10/28/1999, WGBH Media Library & Archives, accessed December 9, 2016, http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_48CCE80031094EB9BEF72BA8C7F090D5.
MLA: “Culture Shock; Hollywood Censored: Movies, Morality and the Production Code.” 10/28/1999. WGBH Media Library & Archives. Web. December 9, 2016. <http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_48CCE80031094EB9BEF72BA8C7F090D5>.
APA: Culture Shock; Hollywood Censored: Movies, Morality and the Production Code. Boston, MA: WGBH Media Library & Archives. Retrieved from http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_48CCE80031094EB9BEF72BA8C7F090D5
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