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Say Brother; Education

Part of Say Brother.

02/15/1976


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Series
Say Brother
Program
Education
Program Number

605

Series Description

Say Brother is WGBH's longest running public affairs television program by, for and about African Americans, and is now known as Basic Black. Since its inception in 1968, Say Brother has featured the voices of both locally and nationally known African American artists, athletes, performers, politicians, professionals, and writers including: Muhammad Ali, Maya Angelou, Thomas Atkins, Amiri Baraka, Doris Bunte, Julian Bond, Stokely Carmichael, Louis Farrakhan, Nikki Giovanni, Odetta Gordon, Henry Hampton, Benjamin Hooks, Jesse Jackson, Hubie Jones, Mel King, Eartha Kitt, Elma Lewis, Haki Madhubuti, Wallace D. Muhammad, Charles Ogletree, Babatunde Olatunji, Byron Rushing, Owusu Sadaukai, and Sonia Sanchez. Series release date: 7/15/1968

Program Description

Host Barbara Barrow discusses the lack of communication between educators and students in the Boston School District with community members Gregory Spence (an attorney for the City of Boston), Kenya Clemens (of the Youth Activities Commission), Jeannette Bolt (playwright, and author of "A Minority Child's Day"), and Dr. Alvin Pouissant (noted psychiatrist and Harvard professor). Issues addressed include the different social backgrounds of educators and students, Black English in the classroom, the role of standardized achievement tests in student evaluations, the need for more humanity in the classroom. Also included in the program are "man on the street" interviews conducted by Associate Producer Vickie Jones (in which she asks people their opinion of black schools with white educators and whether or not black children should be taught by black teachers); an interview with Barbara Sizemore conducted by Jon Brim (on the problems of the Washington, D.C. school system and Sizemore's experiences as a former Superintendent of Schools there); an excerpt from a filmed performance of Bolt's play "A Minority Child's Day;" and the Community Calendar (in which local community and cultural events are listed).

Asset Type

Broadcast program

Media Type

Video

Subjects
African American women
African American school superintendents
African Americans--Attitudes
Civil rights
Clemens, Kenya
Pouissant, Dr. Alvin
Segregation
Brim, Jon
Sizemore, Barbara
Bolt, Jeannette
African Americans--Education--Massachusetts
Spence, Gregory
Students--Rating of
African American theater
Minority Child's Day, A (Theatrical production)
Genres
Magazine
Topics
Race and Ethnicity
Creators
Rivero, Marita (Producer)
White, Conrad (Director)
Marita Rivero (Producer)
Barrow-Murray, Barbara (Associate Producer)
Contributors
Davis, Tony (Production Assistant)
Brim, Jon (Host)
Spooner, Dighton (Researcher)
Hill, Rebecca (Wardrobe)
Palmer, David (Make Up)
Barrow-Murray, Barbara (Host)
Gibson, Patricia (Assistant Director)
Citation
Chicago: “Say Brother; Education,” 02/15/1976, WGBH Media Library & Archives, accessed December 8, 2016, http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_3B5353DEF8B649F2A85DFC687B516516.
MLA: “Say Brother; Education.” 02/15/1976. WGBH Media Library & Archives. Web. December 8, 2016. <http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_3B5353DEF8B649F2A85DFC687B516516>.
APA: Say Brother; Education. Boston, MA: WGBH Media Library & Archives. Retrieved from http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_3B5353DEF8B649F2A85DFC687B516516
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