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This Old House; San Francisco, CA (1998) 1721

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Series
This Old House
Program
San Francisco, CA (1998) 1721
Program Number

1721

Series Description

This Old House's mission is to demystify the home improvement process and to celebrate the fusion of old world craftsmanship and modern technology. Each season features two renovation projects. Project One traditionally consists of 18 new episodes and is filmed in Massachusetts. Project Two features 8 new episodes and is taped in a different region of the country. TWENTY SECOND SEASON: Newlyweds Dan and Heather Beliveau will learn some real lessons about the challenges of urban revitalization when they work alongside the team from This Old House to renovate and expand their new purchase, a three-story 1865 Second Empire-style brick townhouse in Charlestown. See web site to check on daily progress. (eps. 2001-2018) This Old House helps Rob Thompson renovate his new West Palm Beach purchase, a 1925 Mediterranean Revival-style bungalow in the city's historic Flamingo Park neighborhood. Thompson plans to turn the charming 1,000-square-foot main house and its two-story outbuilding into a living-working compound. Thompson plans to spend around $200,000 giving his new home the structural and cosmetic facelift it needs. The outbuilding will undergo a dramatic transformation when its garage section is turned into an office for Thompson's interior design business. The structure's second-floor efficiency apartment will be virtually gutted and reworked to create a comfortable guest suite. Local architect Roger Janssen and contractors John Kern and Harley Edgell are the team leading the project. (eps. 2019-2026) TWENTY FIRST SEASON: The team rebuilds the family home of Dick Silva, older brother of THIS OLD HOUSE contractor Tom Silva, whose home was recently destroyed by fire. (eps. 1901-1919) Santa Barbara homeowner Jan Winford has waited 25 years to expand her tiny 1907 California bungalow on a beautiful lot overlooking the city's historic downtown and the Pacific Ocean beyond. With a solid team of architect Jerry Zimmer and general contractor Steve Crawford, she plans to add a second floor master suite, expand the kitchen, and reshape the entire front facade, with an emphasis on the Arts-and-Crafts style, all on a budget of $200,000. (eps. 1920-1926) TWENTIETH SEASON:This Old House celebrates its 20th anniversary season with the renovation of Susan Denny and Christian Nolen's new purchase -- a sprawling 1886 Queen Anne-style house in the Boston suburb of Watertown, Massachusetts. Around 1915, the original structure was married to a Colonial Revival-style addition, and then given a period makeover. The challenge the This Old House team faces will be to refine both the interior plan and the exterior facade of this classic American home. (eps. 1801-1819) This Old House pursues its traditional snow evading tactic and heads to the southernmost city in the continental United States, Key West, Florida, for the second project of the series' twentieth anniversary season. Over the course of seven new episodes, America's favorite home team, host Steve Thomas and master carpenter Norm Abram, will help new homeowners Michael Miller and Helen Colley renovate their 1866 Conch captain's house. (eps. 1820-1826) NINETEENTH SEASON: America's favorite home team renovates a 1724 Colonial, and its classic post-and-beam barn in Milton, Massachusetts. Over the course of 18 new half-hour episodes, the team will work with a respected Boston architect and a team of interior designers to preserve the home's architechtural integrity, and at the same time update it for 21st century living. The house is located on 2.9 secluded acres, in a sought-after neighborhood of historic homes in Milton, Massachusetts. (eps. 1701-1718) For the second project of the 19th season, Steve and Norm go to San Francisco to take on a unique project: the conversion of a 1907 church (lately a synagogue) into a home for Mark Dvorak, a store designer, and his fiancee Laurie Ann Bishop. A tour of the building reveals cavernous spaces, an institutional feel, dated systems, but a fantastic view of the Bay. Architect Barbara Chambers designed the conversion that will include a two-car garage in the basement, preserved chapel space, kitchen, baths, and three bedrooms.(eps. 1720-1726) EIGHTEENTH SEASON: Norm and Steve escape to the charming New England island of Nantucket to help Bostonians Craig and Kathy McGraw Bentley turn their folk-style Victorian into a year-round retreat. (eps. 1601- 1618). The second project of the 18th season brings TOH to the vibrant southwestern city of Tucson, AZ. Over the course of eight episodes, TOH will help homeowners Colleen and James Meigs renovate their 1930s Pueblo Revival stucco house, located in the National Register of Historic Places neighborhood of Colonia Solana. The striking geometric architecture of the Meigs' home reflects the native American, Spanish and Mexican influences that compromise the true character of the Southwest. (eps. 1619-1626) SEVENTEENTH SEASON: Restoration of a classic Federal-style house, circa 1768 located in Salem, MA. (eps. 1501-1518). The second project heads to Savannah, Georgia to renovate and expand a graceful three-story Italianate Victorian row house located in Savannah's National Historic landmark District. (eps. 1519-1526). SIXTEENTH SEASON: Renovation of a 1710 Colonial house in Acton, MA. (eps. 1401-1418) Second project heads to Napa Valley, California wine country, to refurbish a Victorian farmhouse, with emphasis on upgrading of kitchen. (eps. 1419-1426) FIFTEENTH SEASON: Restoration of a Belmont, MA (owned by Gallants) Victorian home includes removal of asbestos siding, new kitchen, gutter drainage and improving efficiency of oversized windows. (eps. 1301-1318) Second project goes to Oahu, Hawaii, to renovate a 1920s waterfront bungalow, the problems of which include termite infestation. (eps.1319-1326) FOURTEENTH SEASON: Transformation of a postwar ranch in Lexington, MA owned by the Igoes. Renowned architect Graham Gund collaborates on the project. (eps. 1201-1220) Second project involves restoration of a Miami house damaged by Hurricane Andrew. (eps. 1221-1226) THIRTEENTH SEASON: "Renovation on a budget" of 1815 landmark house "Kirkside" in Wayland, MA, listed in National Historic Register (18-20 episodes). Second project is a flat in London, England. TWELFTH SEASON: hosted by Steve Thomas and Norm Abram features a triple decker in Jamaica Plain, MA (18 episodes). Will be featured in HOME Magazine in October 1991. Also "shotgun" house in New Orleans (8 shows). ELEVENTH SEASON: hosted by Steve Thomas and Norm Abram includes the construction of a post and beam barn house & adobe house in New Mexico. TENTH SEASON: hosted by Bob Vila includes the renovation of a 2-family home with handicapped access in in-law apartment and bed and breakfast. NINTH SEASON: includes the renovation of the Weatherbee Farmhouse, and the rehab of a bungalow in California. Series release date: 1979

Program Description

The crew starts the workday at the Powell Street cable car turntable, where cars are spun around by hand for the return trip over to Fisherman's Wharf. On site, general contractor Dan Plummer has three weeks of work to us the woodwork in the chapel has been sanded, the baptismal fount has been filled with concrete for the new fireplace's foundation, and the entire rear addition has been gutted to the walls. The reason: termites. We meet exterminator Bill Pierce as he sprays down the plywood for the new subfloor with a borate solution; the new floor joists are of a pressure-treated Douglas fir that contains no arsenic or chromium, unlike conventional PT lumber. We see a blown-in cellulose insulation treatment of the floor joist bays, and then visit a Gap store that homeowner Mark Dvorak helped to design--the simple, monochromatic finishes are meant to push the clothes forward visually, and Mark and Laurie Ann plan a similar scheme for the church to highlight their furniture and art collection. Back at the site, the crew learns about differences in San Francisco's plumbing code--galvanized pipe for gas, copper waste--and meets radiant-heat specialist Mike Luttrell to discuss how to heat the vast chapel space. In the basement, framing contractor Jay Greg discusses seismic upgrades, and a civil engineer does a hydraulic pull test on some of the building's epoxied sill bolts. Finally, we catch up with architect Barbara Chambers and city engineer Kris Kilgore as they work out a street-grading solution for the building's new garage entrance.

Asset Type

Broadcast program

Media Type

Video

Genres
Instructional
Topics
Home Improvement
Creators
Morash, Russell (Series Producer)
Citation
Chicago: “This Old House; San Francisco, CA (1998) 1721,” WGBH Media Library & Archives, accessed December 8, 2016, http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_2E9896A161024C2AA42EDE935334BB95.
MLA: “This Old House; San Francisco, CA (1998) 1721.” WGBH Media Library & Archives. Web. December 8, 2016. <http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_2E9896A161024C2AA42EDE935334BB95>.
APA: This Old House; San Francisco, CA (1998) 1721. Boston, MA: WGBH Media Library & Archives. Retrieved from http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_2E9896A161024C2AA42EDE935334BB95
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